Jill Finkelstein - Compass



Posted by Jill Finkelstein on 1/20/2019

Most people you ask will say they'd love to volunteer, but they don't have the time or schedule consistency for an ongoing volunteer commitment. They're afraid of saying yes and not being able to follow through. A fair reason for not joining a volunteer group or signing up to help out at your local charity, but there are volunteer opportunities you can take advantage of without making a long-term commitment. Here are some excellent ideas for getting involved in the betterment of your community if you don't have a lot of time or consistency in your schedule.

  1. Seasonal and Holiday opportunities: When buying school supplies for your kids participate in the back-to-school programs where you buy supplies for a student in need. The winter holidays offer many ways to get involved from volunteering at a soup kitchen on Thanksgiving or Christmas Day, delivering food to the elderly on holidays or putting together a set of gifts for a less fortunate family or child. Pick up a few extra gifts while you’re already out shopping for your family. Participate in your community Easter egg hunt by providing candies or helping hide eggs in the local park. 
  2. Annual opportunities: You can start small by finding one volunteer opportunity per season. Does your church or local community center host an annual neighborhood-wide yard sale? Do you have one Saturday to offer your services at a fun run or marathon? You don't have to do the running; you can help run a water booth or hand out informational materials for a charity in which you believe to event attendees. Volunteer to work at your local polling place on election day, it’s just a day! You can commit your time to only one day or one weekend and plan to help out.
  3. One time, anytime: If you can't think of any single activity that you can do, try opening your mind and heart to spontaneously contributing "in the moment." Share your to-go food with a hungry person, bring soup over to a sick neighbor, offer to mow the lawn, rake leaves, or wash the car for a senior in your community. Say yes when the grocery clerk asks if you'd like to donate a dollar or two to a local charity. Buy candy bars or cookies from your local children’s groups and share them around your office.

The least complicated way to contribute is by making small monetary donations or engaging in one-time commitment-free acts of kindness and community support. If you want to get involved in volunteer and charitable opportunities in your neighborhood you absolutely can, anytime. Don’t let the fear of commitment get in the way of you making a difference in your community. 

If you're seeking a new home, and volunteer opportunities are essential to you in your new neighborhood share that desire with your real estate agent, so they can help you find a community with active engagement opportunities.




Tags: community  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jill Finkelstein on 10/9/2016

Some people think that bigger is better even when it comes to buying a home. Before you buy the biggest house your budget allows you may want to consider if the size of the home is what will make you a happy homeowner. Besides the size of the home there are many other factors to consider, here are a few things you may want to think about when buying: Your Commute Often times a bigger home is one that has a longer commute. So would you choose a bigger home over a shorter commute? When considering a longer commute most home buyers significantly underestimate the negatives of a long commute like high stress levels, poorer health, and less active social lives.  Swiss economists, Bruno Frey and Alois Stutzer coined what they call “the commuters paradox”. They found that someone with a one-hour commute must earn 40% more money than someone who walks to work to be as satisfied with life. Community Another thing that can affect buyer satisfaction is the quality of a surrounding community Think about the community your home would be in. Is it a subdivision? Do you have to drive to get places? How far away are neighbors or stores? Walkable communities have more active residents, they are better for the environment and help us save money too. Studies have shown residents of a walkable neighborhood on average weigh 6 to 10 pounds less than someone in a car-dependent one. Walkable neighborhoods also give us more opportunities for social interaction. The more neighbors walk around the more involved they are in the community. Ultimately the more community involvement the happier people are.        







Jill Finkelstein